Faith and Finances

Growing up, it seemed like everything I wanted required an amount of money I didn’t have. From shoes to clothes and hanging out with friends—it all cost something! My understanding of money stemmed from not having it and not having money caused me to want it more than anything else. 

 

When I was a little boy, I stole ten dollars out of my mother’s purse. I’ll never forget that day. It was Friday. My school was selling pickles and popcorn and she wouldn’t give me money for it. On that Friday, I bought my cousins and I pickles and popcorn and we ate it before we arrived home. When I got home, I got a nice whooping for my behavior. As a child, raised by a single mother, I had no idea how my stealing impacted her finances. After that day, I knew money had to be earned-not stolen. 

 

Fast forward to teenage years. I started working at the age of thirteen. I couldn’t wait to earn my own money because I knew it gave me access to what I wanted. At this job, I was making three hundred dollars every two weeks. My mother set up a bank account for me and having my own money was everything I imagined. When I got paid, I bought what I wanted. I never saved and I ran out of money the week I got paid. Anxiously, I waited for my next check to have money again. The wait was painful!  My mind was filled with thoughts of what I would do next with the money. I spent until I had no more.

 

Money was important to me. I literally loved it. I loved all that I could do with it. Therefore, I worked as much as I could to obtain money. I’ve been in the workforce for 19 years and I’m only 32!

 

For the first quarter of my life, I thought the money was the source of life. I didn’t understand money as a resource given by God. However, when I started my journey with God, the Bible gave me a new perspective on money. I learned three valuable lessons I would like to share:

 

1. God is the Source of Life 
2. What You Spend Your Money on–Shows Where Your Heart is 
3. Giving is an Act of Worship unto God 

 

God is the Source of Life

 

“In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” Genesis‬ ‭1:1‬ ‭NIV‬‬

 

“The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it;”

‭‭Psalms‬ ‭24:1‬ ‭NIV‬‬

 

After reading scripture, I learned that God is the creator of the heavens and the earth and everything in it (Genesis 1). This fact alone changed my mindset. If God created me; then, my livelihood is reliant on Him not money. Without God, I can’t work—let alone breathe. Therefore, God is the source of life. Without God, money wouldn’t mean anything.

 

What You Spend Your Money on, Shows Where Your Heart is 

“For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.” Matthew‬ ‭6:21‬ ‭NIV

 

When I reflect on my past and what I spent my money on, I can see my heart desires. I desired to be accepted by others. Everything I bought was to cope with my brokenness and rejection. Majority of my life, I spent my money on new clothes and shoes, food, and entertainment. I spent it to make me feel good and to make people like me. Every time I gave, I expected something in return. I used money to create a life different than the life I truly had and I never made enough to do that.

 

 

Giving is an Act of Worship Unto God

 

I had no idea that money could be given without getting something back. Before this revelation, I viewed money as power to purchase. I never saw it the way God meant it to be. Once I allowed God into my life, I discovered I was a steward of the money I earned. As an act of worship to God, I can use my money to help people. I started to view money as a way to sustain my life and bless others. Now, I give as an act of worship to God. I give to people in need, my local church and other places I feel led to give. In conclusion, I learned that money is only a resource God gave us to do His will on earth. We have to give our finances to God and spend money in a way that honors and brings Him glory. That looks different for everyone.

Homosexuality, the Church and God

It takes sex between a man and woman to procreate; but, does it take sexuality? There are many debates about sexuality; such as, what is a sexual sin and what is acceptable to God? Should a person have only one sexual partner? Should a person be married before having sex? Is sex only permitted between a man and woman?

It’s important to note that sex was created by God, which means that it is in no way inherently bad. Sex is good! Concurrently, we must note that God’s construct of sex came with boundaries. However, in my opinion, mankind have deviated and ventured outside the boundaries of God’s perfect intention of sex. In this blog, I want to explore homosexuality, the church and God—to examine questions; such as, is homosexuality a sin? What role does the church play, and how does God view it?

Homosexuality is a romantic attraction, sexual attraction or sexual behavior between members of the same sex or gender. Though thoughts and considerations may be new or changing, homosexuality is not a new sexuality. There are many historical theories about homosexuality. According to Psychology Today,  in 1968, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) classified homosexuality as a mental disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM). However, years later, that diagnosis was nullified by the conclusion that practicing homosexuality does not hinder a person’s livelihood— although it brings a set of challenges. Despite these “challenges,” the APA considers homosexuality a “normal variant of human sexuality”. 

In this debate on the morality of homosexuality, our greatest dilemma will be law vs morals. Our laws may change, but if they are no longer moral, we must keep our morals and endure the punishment of breaking unjust laws.

Over the years, many nations developed sets of morals and laws surrounding sexuality. Those morals and laws were derived from many sources; such as, philosophy, science, Deity (God), etc.. Some nations have permitted homosexual activities without consequence, while others exiled whoever participated in such behavior. To this very day there are still 70 of the worlds 195 countries that still in someway ban or outlaw acts of homosexuality. Though America thinks herself “progressive,” there were still laws prohibiting homosexual acts on the books as recently as 2003. Yet, today in America, we face a historic moment in which our nation is at the tipping point of a new belief system regarding homosexuality. Now, more than ever, people want to understand homosexuality and rather or not it’s wrong. The current debate is attempting to nullify biblical laws that have governed America and guided the morality of western civilization for centuries. 

America adopted some of its laws and morals from those given by God to the chosen nation of Israel. In the book of Genesis, it is written that God created man and woman to “be fruitful and multiply (procreate).” Later on, God, gave laws to shape the culture of His chosen nation to model His desires for humanity in the earth. In the book of Leviticus in the Bible, God expressed who can have sex with who and who couldn’t have sex with who (Leviticus 18). The purpose was to separate God’s people by  their actions and behaviors from the rest of the people in the land. Before he ever reaches the subject of homosexuality there are 12 verses simply explaining why we shouldn’t have relations with close family members. This was out of love and protection of his people. His laws did not permit homosexual activity; therefore, making it an enmity against God-if committed. Which means, it is morally wrong—which makes it a sin. Consequently, if the laws are broken, the people are punished by God. This is the inception of punitive activity towards civil disobedience. Therefore, in my theological opinion, Homosexuality is a sinful act. 

Times have changed and people are fighting to have homosexuality morally acceptable with society and God. Unlike the psychiatric argument, biblical authority concerning this topic has not been nullified.  The New Testament declares it sexually immoral, but scholars debate that Mankind states that because homosexual isn’t an Aramaic term. Scholars are debating on scriptures and exegetical interpretations of God’s documented words and if He approves or disapproves. Scholars also state that it’s deemed immoral from the standpoint of evil practices within the practice. For example, murder is immoral if you just kill people; but, it’s moral if you’re protecting your country. This debate is being applied to the discourse surrounding homosexuality. History is being created as I type this blog. Change is among us. In this contemporary age, we stand at a crossroads.  Churches are cautiously or haphazardly declaring their stance. For homosexuals this is the final obstacle towards complete permission to practice homosexuality without social or spiritual condemnation. 

As a Christian and someone who has been converted from homosexuality, I believe God’s original words concerning sexual relations remain true today. I believe the Holy Spirit confirms it within our mind and emotions. After accepting Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior and receiving salvation, I believe the Holy Spirit resets us and aligns us with God’s original desire for our lives. Man and woman, marriage, procreation, and family. I believe church serves as a community to cultivate God’s desire and intention for humanity. However, I’m afraid for the church, because the agenda to nullify God’s logic for humanity and intention for sexual relations is being challenged at the core. The army of those who support homosexual activity is large and strong. We are at the crossroads of a new morality. The question is, how will the church cultivate God’s intention for humanity without being deemed judgmental and hateful. How will churches embrace people who have found comfort and their identity in homosexual activity? In my opinion, all of this must be addressed through preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ, with love, and pointing everyone towards Jesus Christ and baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. I believe the Holy Spirit will align everyone who believes mind with God’s original intention for humanity. Therefore, in church, we must accurately exegete scripture to bring understanding to God’s intention for humanity.

In closing, I will share my encounter with God after writing this blog. After I did my research, wrote, and revised- I paused and prayed. Alone, in silence, I asked God “what is your view on this?” After asking, I felt God’s  presence all around me. As tears welled up in my eyes, a small still voice said, “I’m waiting.” God is waiting. As a patient parent, He is waiting for all of us to find our way back to him. It is written in 2 Peter 3:9 of the Bible, “The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent.” God is waiting for humanity to make its way back to Him. 

The Black Church Dilemma

“Church” is the English translation of the Greek word Ekklesia, which originally meant “to call out” and was later changed to mean “assembly.” According to the Bible, in Matthew 16:18, the church was introduced by Jesus the Messiah and developed by His chosen disciples (followers/students) who later became Apostles (messengers/sent forth ones). In Romans 12:5, the Apostle Paul describes the church as a body. Based on these references, I will define the church as a group of people who have been called out by God to believe in Jesus Christ and assemble together to fulfill God’s mission in the earth. God’s mission is to bring salvation and reconcile the world back to Himself through Jesus Christ. According to scripture, this is done through,

  • Evangelism sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ (Matthew 28:19-20)
  • Discipleship equip believers to grow and serve (Ephesians 4:11-13)
  • Christian living a life that is worthy of God’s calling (Romans 6)
  • Service Helping the less fortunate (Matthew 23:11)

For Blacks in America, our experience with church dates back to slavery in the 18th and 19th century. “The Black Church: Its Impact on Black Culture” by Vanessa Taylor explains the system of slavery was built on the dehumanization and exploitation of Blacks. Taylor writes, “The dominant white culture of the time accomplished this through a system of forced acculturation, which included forced religious conversion.” While Blacks knew God, their experience was limited. Their one-on-one intimacy with God was infringed upon.  It wasn’t until slavery was abolished and Blacks were no longer criminalized for learning that they could actively participate in church. However, due to rejection and the inability to worship with Whites, they were forced to worship among Blacks only. This birthed the inception of the “Black Church.”

The “Black Church” is a term used to describe Protestant churches that have predominantly black congregations. The Black Church serves a myriad of functions for Blacks in America. Historically, the Black Church has provided social service functions and is responsible for the eventual formation of African-American seminaries, Black colleges and academies, insurance companies, banks, the NAACP, and the civil rights movement of the sixties. For many years, the Black Church has been the cornerstone of hope for the black community, especially off the heels of slavery. Although it is great how far the black church has come, I believe we stand at a crossroad. I believe we have a dilemma and it’s rooted in the ramifications of slavery, segregation and inequality. Additionally, societal issues such as LGBTQ equality and mass incarceration are creating pressure for black clergy and challenging the very core of the Black Church. Are we able to address growing issues, such as:

  • How will the Black Church respond and minister to homosexuals in an increasingly homosexual-friendly society?

  • How will the Black Church handle the decrease in church attendance and the increase in participation in social justice movements without the church?  

  • How will the Black Church respond and minister to the non-traditional family structure that doesn’t reflect a mother, father, and child?

  • How will the Black Church handle the endangerment of Black boys in America?

  • How will the Black Church handle and respond to the burden of mass incarceration as a new caste system for Blacks in America?

  • Will the Black and White Church unite despite our cultural differences?

If you’re reading this, you may have a solution, what are some ways the church can address these issues?

Prison and God

Part One: My Story

Blacks are being incarcerated at a higher rate than any other race in America. According to the Prison Policy Initiative, 40% of the people in prison today are people of color. Black men are six times as likely to be incarcerated as white men. For black men in their thirties, one in every 10 are in prison or jail on any given day. Some people have described mass incarceration as a hidden agenda—a new caste system to enslave black people in America.

In a recent conversation with my older cousin, he said, “Mass incarceration is a tool used to keep God’s people broken.” After reflecting on such a provocative thought, I remembered how nearly every adult male I knew as a child went to prison. My biological father and the majority of my uncles were incarcerated at some point in their lives. Some were gone for many years for drug offenses, while others went to prison for shorter sentences for smaller crimes. For so long, I considered my father and uncles “bad guys.” It was not until I had an encounter of my own with the law that my perception of them and myself changed.

In 2012, I nearly went to prison for 4-6 years for “failure to stop a crime.” This was life-changing and very eye-opening for me. From one experience, I was dismissed from my graduate program and fired from my job. Humiliation barely scratches the surface of what I felt. I was labeled a criminal and “a bad guy.” I spent almost five years in litigation for being at the wrong place at the wrong time. Overall, I spent seven years being untangled from the web of the  justice system. I thank God I didn’t go to prison physically, but psychologically I became a prisoner to the trauma of being labeled and targeted as a Black man. This experience forced me to ask God many questions—why? Why was prison on my journey towards graduating from college? Am I a criminal? Was God punishing me?

I felt like a criminal. I felt bad, wrong. Not one of my accomplishments mattered in that moment. I was a statistic and my hard work came to an end. I’ll never forget that day in court. The judge looked at me and said, “You are being charged with a felony. Your bond is $300,000. You are a flight risk and a threat to the community.” The irony of this is, at that time, my current job was to serve the community. Yet, I was being charged and considered a threat. After hearing this, I threw my head back and allowed tears to roll out of my eyes as I whispered, “Oh God.” I was simply hanging out with friends, at a party, and this happened. After spending seven days in jail, five years in court and two years under court supervision, I can honestly say the justice system is unfair towards Black men. I believe it targets completely innocent people and imprison them. I believe it captures those who commit the crime, those connected to those who do the crime and those who are there and have no idea a crime is taking place. What’s complex about this is actually determining what is a crime. Often, blacks are involved in something that may resemble a crime, but it’s not. The justice system will sometimes exaggerate what was done and stretch the truth to make an incident become a crime—especially when Black men are involved. Again, this is all my opinion my personal experience and observation. I can only back it up by the countless stories of black men being incarcerated for crimes they didn’t do or crimes they didn’t know was a crime. I had no idea that being with someone who did wrong made the person who didn’t do anything a criminal. Guilty by association? I’m convinced that black men in America are in need of justice, redemption and the justice system needs to be reformed.

Biblically, the children of Israel (God’s chosen people) were enslaved by the Egyptians. In the book of Exodus (Exodus 1:1-22), it is written, the Egyptians placed slave masters over the Israelite people and oppressed them. The Egyptians were so threatened by the growth—they started to kill the boys. Biblically, this slavery is not considered punishment from God. However, they suffered and God didn’t intervene until they cried out to Him. After they cried out, God raised up Moses to emancipate them from slavery. God liberated the Israelite people so they could worship Him. Later in the Bible, we read how God redeems Israel in the wilderness and reforms society with His principles of justice.

Like Ancient Egypt, America enslaved Blacks. Like the Israelite people, Blacks were issued slave owners and worked hard without pay. They were fruitful and multiplied like the Israelite people and were oppressed for hundreds of years before they were liberated. Once blacks were liberated in America, they didn’t go to a wilderness for redemption like the Israelite people, they stayed in the same country among the same people who enslaved them. This is where the narrative differs from God’s chosen people. Could it be, Blacks are unable to be completely redeemed because we are still among those who once owned us? Does the freedom and progression of Blacks threaten the American empire? Are Blacks suffering because our dependence/faith remains upon our oppressor instead of God? Or even this: how do you positively impact and change the place you inhabit when its structure is built upon your oppression? Where is God in all of this?

I believe, God is within us. Unlike ancient biblical times, we are now in the era of Jesus Christ—the Gospel era. Like Moses, God sent Jesus to save the world. Like Jesus, Black men are falsely accused of crimes they did not commit. Jesus  is falsely accused of a crime, placed in prison, and killed as punishment. The Roman Empire imprisons Jesus, kills him and God redeems him by raising Him from the dead. As a result of this, those who believe in Jesus are saved and made right with God. There is a formula… slavery, punishment, redemption and reform. Do we need all of them? Is slavery good? Does punishment push us towards redemption despite the fact we may be falsely accused and or imprisoned?

God sends Jesus Christ to redeem mankind once and for all. However, in America, Blacks redemption is complex. Despite our redemption, we struggle to experience absolute freedom. I believe America is hindering God’s plan for Blacks. Reformation starts with recognition that there is a flaw in the societal system. We can see that Blacks are being imprisoned at much higher rates than any other race in America. Is this because we are the most sinful? Are we the “bad guys?” I don’t think so! Could we be involved in another form of slavery for the advancement of another group of people? Maybe! Do we need to cry out to God? Absolutely! Are Blacks being punished for ancient sin? I don’t think so. I think they are being oppressed. Could reform be achieved in a place that slavery has existed? I think so, but it may take us some time. If we advocate now, things can start changing. But, without God we can’t do it. Historically, God has been the liberator. We need Him to help us. We have to speak up on this and fight for change like Moses and maybe even die like Jesus. In order to do this, I believe we need to accept the story of Jesus Christ as truth. We need to believe in Him so that our sin can be forgiven and we can receive the Holy Spirit, which is God’s Spirit within us. With the Holy Spirit within us, we can live righteous lives and have the true power to turn from sin, which brings punishment. As a result of living righteous and powerful, we can then make the proper argument against injustice. But, it has to start with being in right standing with God, because He is the liberator.

In conclusion, America is a country that believes in civil death instead of redemption. Where is God in all of this? I believe He is with us, and our redemption still exists—even if it isn’t visibly tangible in the society we live in. We have to fight the good fight by challenging the systems in place and continue to share the Gospel. This is a heavy topic to tackle, I’m just sharing some of my thoughts. Here are a few reformation questions I’d like to ask to contribute to the discussion that is already taking place:

How does society shift its toxic dependency and usage of the penal system?

What can be implemented to ensure ex-felons have the opportunity to healthily and strategically return to society as productive and reformed citizens?

What does a reformed penal system look like? What does a penal system rid of discrimination and racial bias look like? How does it function and how is it properly being implemented?

Part Two: Satisfying Father Hunger

The bible says God adopts us into his family through Jesus Christ. In Ephesians 1:4 (NLT) the Apostle Paul says:

“God decided in advance to adopt us into his own family by bringing us to himself through Jesus Christ. This is what he wanted to do, and it gave him great pleasure.”

When I accepted Jesus as my Lord and Savior, I was adopted into God’s family. My father became the Creator of the universe. Older and so much wiser, I see now God has always been there for me. Through Jesus Christ, I met my eternal fatherthe one who created me. He knew me before my mother and father even conceived me. My calling and purpose became clear to me when I married my wife and was blessed with a father-in-law. He was connected to God and through our divine connection, God spoke to me as He did Moses.

We need earthly fathers–a male figure physically and spiritually present in our everyday lives. Jesus had an earthly father, but He also revealed God as His father. We need God the Father and physical fathers in the earth. It takes both to fulfill God’s mission and purpose in the earth.

Another example of a father figure is a mentor–someone that will assume the responsibilities of teaching, raising, nurturing a younger person who is not his/her biological child. God will send us mentors to show His fatherhood towards us.

In the bible, there are great men not raised by their biological fathers. For example, Samuel was raised and mentored by Eli (a priest). Elisha left his family and followed Elijah. Jesus, whose biological father was God, was raised by Joseph.

I know God can, will and does use fatherless people. I also believe the destruction of fathers/son dynamics hinders the progression of God’s mission in the earth. Hypothetically speaking, if my father was connected to God and raised me, I believe I could have discovered my purpose sooner. Maybe life could have been different for me. Maybe I would not have struggled as much as I did

Let’s pause right here. Take a moment to think about your biological parents. 

If your father or mother were not in your life as you believe they should be, maybe their only purpose was to conceive you. My advice would be not to dwell on them being absent. Love is not geneticit is learned. Just because the DNA match does not mean love is there. This may sound harsh but reflect on that thought for a moment.

Consider you were born for the purposes of being raised and loved by someone else. Once you discover that your true parent is God, your expectations of your earthly parent(s) can and will be lowered. They are merely stewards on this earth. Raising you is a job that they may didn’t have the qualifications for. Believe me, God will burden someone to love you because He loves you. This is the revelation!

If you are experiencing Father Hunger, can I pray for you? If I can, read below:

Heavenly Father,

Thank you for your love and affection. I pray that you would send mentors and father figures into the lives of those who are suffering from father hunger. Jesus, I ask that you place a burden on the hearts of men of God to mentor and be father figures to the fatherless in the faith and those who don’t know You also. God, fill us and keep us as we wait. Heal us and open our eyes to see who really wants to help us. We trust Your will to be done. Thank You for always being so mindful and thoughtful of us. It is in Your son, Jesus’s name, we pray. Amen.

Part One: Father Hunger

As any young man, there was a need for my father.

But like so many others, mine was not there.

Robert McGee, author of “Father Hunger,” describes this book-entitled condition as an individual having a deep need for love and affection of their father. Because this need is unfulfilled, they feel empty, which oftentimes evolves into bitterness, fear, and pain. I know for a fact I suffered from this and to be honest, I’m still processing some of the effects.

My father hunger would spark great reflection upon my relationship with God. Did my father’s absence hinder my understanding of God’s word? Did my father’s absence limit my ability to comprehend God and His purpose for mankind–specifically, His purpose for men? To answer these questions, some studying was required, and I was moved to start with the book of Genesis in the Bible.

Genesis starts with the creation story of man, Adam and from Adam, God creates a woman, Eve. What’s so crucial about this is God creates man in His image, but the Bible does not say God is Adam’s father.

A couple questions arise for me: was Adam fatherless? Or was God his father? If God is Adam’s father, how did he raise him? In my opinion, God proves great fatherhood here—Adam inherits everything God creates. This proves God believes in legacy. Also, God instructs Adam to name what He has created—this is teaching Adam responsibility, the power of his words, and also what is mine is yours. Furthermore, Adam overall has direct access to God. In order for any father/son relationship to work, there must be honest, open, transparent communication.

With that being said, we only have a rather short narrative of Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden. God gives Adam and Eve instructions and they disobey. As a result, they were punished by God. Thus, Adam is the first father on earth.

From Adam, many fathers are born. However, God is not pleased with mankind. As punishment, He floods the earth but spares Noah and his family. God starts over with Noah–establishes a new covenant and he then becomes the first father of the new world. Throughout the Old Testament, after Noah, we see an incredible lineage that is God-focused but also, we see a great covenant with God. The father establishes a relationship with God and teaches his son to have one. In his death, his son(s) will continue on and fulfill the work of God.

God’s covenant was first threatened by the systemic prosecution of sons in Egypt. In the book of Exodus, Pharaoh attempts to destroy God’s covenant by killing the Hebrew sons (God’s chosen people). Moses would then become the first example of being fatherless but chosen to fulfill God’s work.

Moses’s mother sent him away to protect him from persecution. Moses was adopted by the daughter of Pharaoh and was raised within the empire as an Egyptian. However, it was not until he connected to his father-in-law, Jethro, that he has a mind-blowing encounter with God and discovers the purpose of his life. From a biblical standpoint, it is evident fatherhood is essential to God’s mission.

This intentional obstruction of God’s covenant and destructive mentality is relevant today–the war on the Black family. Young Black men are not legally being killed, but you see the attack on them through police brutality, discrimination, and racial bias. But these are remnants of the oldest system of oppression: slavery–a tragic era where Blacks were handled as property and most importantly, their family structure didn’t matter. Therefore, in order to keep the property in compliance with the overarching goal, the family was separated. The father was removed and sold to another owner or worst, killed. Now, 72 percent of Black children are born without fathers according to the US Census Bureau. This then inspired reflection on my father’s absence from a systemic perspective and raises a couple more questions: if this is God’s covenant, where do I fit in God’s mission as a fatherless man? Am I qualified to be used by God without being raised by a father?

Although my father was absent, I understand now it wasn’t his fault–completely. As a black man in this country, I have discovered my father and I exist within a system designed not only to impede upon and sever our dynamic but also, ensure this cycle continues through generation to generation. In 1987, my father was 19 years old when I was conceived. He was a Black boy who made an adult decision. He didn’t have the resources or knowledge to raise me. I’m confident there wasn’t a father figure in his life to steer or lead him in the direction he should go. Nor was he my mother’s husband. He was a byproduct of a system that forces Black men to abandon their greatest commitments–their families, and/or also, self-destruct. Yes, I grew up fatherless, but all hope was not lost. In part two, I will explain how I satisfied my father hunger. In the meantime, let’s reflect on this post. In one word, drop how you feel in the comments.

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